About elections at AU

COUNTING VOTES AND ALLOCATION OF SEATS

 

The votes are counted in the electronic election system. When counting the votes, the D’Hondt method is used. 

Counting and allocation example:

 

Eight seats must be allocated through an election. There are four lists in the election.

  1. First, the seats are allocated according to list pacts (read about list pacts in the FAQ) and candidate lists.
  2. Then, the seats won are allocated within the lists.

1. Allocation of seats to list pacts and candidate lists

The four lists have received the following number of votes: A: 25, B: 31, C: 11 and D: 16. The number of votes is divided by 1, 2, 3 and 4. 

Result with lists C and D in a list pact. 

List

/1

/2

/3

/4

A

25

12,5

8,33

6,25

B

31

15,5

10,33

7,75

C/D

27

13,5

9,00

6,75

 

The seats are allocated according to a falling average figure (falling figures in the above calculation) as follows: 

  1. Seats: B (31)
  2. Seats C + D (27)
  3. Seats A (25)
  4. Seats B (15.5)
  5. Seats C+D (13.5)
  6. Seats A (12.5)
  7. Seats B (10.33)
  8. Seats C+D (9) 

 

List A gets two seats, list B gets three seats while the list pact gets a total of three seats which are distributed in the same way within the list pact: 

List

/1

/2

C

11,0

5,5

D

16,0

8,0

  1. Seats: D (16)
  2. Seats: C (11)
  3. Seats: D (8)

 

 

 

List C gets one seat and list D gets two.

 

If list C and list D had not entered into a list pact, the allocation of seats would have been different:

 

Result without list pact

List

/1

/2

/3

A

25

12,5

8,33

B

31

15,5

10,33

C

11

5,5

3,66

D

16

8

5,33

 Seats: B (31)

Seats: A (25)

Seats: D (16)

Seats: B (15.5)

Seats: A (12.5)

Seats: C (11)

Seats: B (10.33)

Seats: A (8.33)

 

Lists A and B thus get three seats each while lists C and D get one seat. Thus, as a result of the list pact, one seat moves between list A and list D.

2. Allocation of seats within a candidate list

 

After the seats have been allocated between the candidate lists, the seats which are allocated to each list are then divided between the candidates in the list. 

 

Candidate lists with even (non-prioritised) ranking

 

Three seats must be divided between five candidates on one list. The candidates have achieved the following number of votes:

  • A: 21
  • B: 11
  • C: 8
  • D: 28
  • E: 11

 

In connection with candidate lists with even ranking, the seats are allocated according to the candidates' personal votes.  Candidates who are not elected will serve as alternates for the list's elected candidates in the same order. If two candidates have received the same number of votes, lots are drawn to decide the outcome.

 

D and A get the first and second seat, respectively. Lots will be drawn between B and E for the last seat. The loser will be the first alternate, while C will be the second alternate.

Candidate lists with prioritised ranking    

 

Three seats must be distributed between five candidates on one list. The list has received 132 votes, as follows:

 

The list: 75 votes

  1. candidate: 28 votes
  2. candidate: 14 votes
  3. candidate: 2 votes
  4. candidate: 11 votes
  5. candidate: 2 votes 

132 votes in total 

 

The list's distribution number is found by dividing the list's total number of votes with the number which is one higher than the number of seats which are allocated to the list: 132/4 = 33

 

Distribution number: 33

 

The candidates on the list are assigned list votes in order of priority until the distribution number has been reached: 

  1. candidate is assigned (33-28) five list votes and is thus elected
  2. candidate is assigned (33-14) 19 list votes and is thus elected
  3. candidate is assigned (33-2) 31 list votes and is thus elected 

 

The third candidate thus gets a seat despite a very low number of personal votes as he has a share in the list votes.

 

If, however, the votes were distributed as follows, the result would have been different:

 

The list: 38 votes

  1. candidate: 18 votes
  2. candidate: 16 votes
  3. candidate: 8 votes
  4. candidate: 46 votes
  5. candidate: 6

 

132 votes in total

 

Distribution number (132/4) = 33

 

The candidates on the list are assigned list votes in order of priority until the distribution number has been reached: 

  1. candidate is assigned (33-18) 15 list votes and is thus elected
  2. candidate is assigned (33-16) 17 list votes and is thus elected
  3. candidate gets the remaining list votes (six list votes) but does not achieve the distribution number of 33.    

The fourth candidate gets the seat because he has reached the distribution number solely on the basis of the number of personal votes – and, as the rules have been formulated, this is not possible for the other candidates. The fourth candidate gets the first seat because, by virtue of his personal votes, he has achieved the distribution number, while candidates 1 and 2 can only be elected on the basis of the list votes – and they thus get the second and third seat. The fourth candidate has thus jumped the list order with his personal votes.